Get A Companion to the Anthropology of Japan (Blackwell PDF

By Jennifer Robertson

ISBN-10: 0631229558

ISBN-13: 9780631229551

This ebook is an unheard of number of 29 unique essays via many of the world’s such a lot unique students of Japan. Covers a wide diversity of matters, together with the colonial roots of anthropology within the jap academy; eugenics and country construction; majority and minority cultures; genders and sexualities; and model and nutrients cultures Resists stale and deceptive stereotypes, by means of offering new views on eastern tradition and society Makes jap society available to readers surprising with the rustic

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New PDF release: A Companion to the Anthropology of Japan (Blackwell

This publication is an extraordinary choice of 29 unique essays by way of a number of the world’s such a lot exceptional students of Japan. Covers a extensive variety of matters, together with the colonial roots of anthropology within the eastern academy; eugenics and state construction; majority and minority cultures; genders and sexualities; and style and foodstuff cultures Resists stale and deceptive stereotypes, through offering new views on jap tradition and society Makes jap society obtainable to readers unexpected with the rustic

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Nevertheless, Yanagita was pleased that students at the University of Tokyo were studying folklore, so he permitted Oka to attend his study group. Among the books Oka read in laying a foundation in ethnology were Wilhelm Schmidt and Wilhelm Koppers’ Vo¨lker und Kulturen, vol. 3, Der Mensch alter Zeiten (1924; the Japanese translation was published in 1944), W. H. R. Rivers’ The History of Melanesian Society (1914), and Heinrich Shurtz’s Altersklassen und Ma¨nnerbu¨nde. Eine Darstellung der Grundformen der Gesellschaft (Age Grades and Men’s Associations: An Outline of the Foundation of Society; 1902).

Before being assigned to Keijo Imperial University, Akiba had studied anthropology in England with Edward Westermarck. Based at Tokyo Imperial University, Akamatsu studied religious psychology and sociology in France under the direction of ´ mile Durkheim. Akiba and Akamatsu conducted fieldwork together on religious E anthropology and focused specifically on shamanism in Korea and Manchuria. They collected the songs of Korean shamans and published them in their jointly authored book, Cho¯sen fu ¯zoku no kenkyu ¯ (The Study of Korean Shamanism), which included the original verses in Korean together with their Japanese translations (Akamatsu and Akiba 1937–38).

3 Even those whose geographical areas of specialty were profoundly impacted by Japanese (cultural) imperialism have tended to overlook or ignore that history. Others, in conversations, have categorically dismissed Japan as ‘‘uninteresting,’’ often exhibiting a disturbing tendency to invoke uninformed stereotypes about ‘‘the Japanese’’ as a rationale. 14 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 J E N N I F E R R O B E RT S O N I feel that it is especially appropriate to draw at length from my 1998 publication on the place of Japan in American anthropology not only because what I wrote there remains relevant, but also because the very high price of the hardcover edited volume in which it appears seems to have precluded its wide circulation.

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A Companion to the Anthropology of Japan (Blackwell Companions to Anthropology) by Jennifer Robertson


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